Theme: Places and people

This Crisis Response Conference will look at the two most vital elements of society – people and where they live, examining the risks and threats that are inherent in urban areas, whether when working, living or during leisure activities. Add to this how we are increasingly becoming connected, both as individuals and through our infrastructure. How do we ensure the safety, security, resilience, well-being and flourishing of communities in urban areas, set against the backdrop of future disruptions and crises?

The answer has to lie in greater transdisciplinary co-operation between governments, authorities, business, front line emergency responders, the private sector and, of course people.

Day one will comprise a series of panel discussions around safe cities, space technology and generations of the future. Meanwhile, day two will examine people and their safety in work and leisure, culminating in a masterclass discussion looking at future crisis trends and risks, and what society needs to do to confront them.

 

Day One

Societal Resilience: Smart Cities, Safe Cities – connected society, connected infrastructure

Urban populations are increasing and cites are evolving faster than ever before. With this growth, comes increased vulnerabilities, as well as increased opportunities, and possible unforeseen interdependencies that may cause crises. But, if information is the currency of an intelligent society, what are the ways we can make urban areas more resilient and secure – and their populations happy – harnessing interconnectivity developments for good?

TimeSession
10:00 – 12:00

Session 1. Smart cities, smart services, resilient populations

With increasing trends in urbanisation and growing cities, come increased risks and hazards, especially in terms of safety, resilience to natural hazards, and security. How to ensure that communities in highly urbanised areas flourish? This session, comprising several experts from different disciplines, will discuss varying perspectives on the future and how to make urban areas resilient and safe into the next century and beyond.

12:00 – 13:30

Lunch and Capability Workshops

13:30 – 15:20

Session 2. Out of Space – space technology improving life on earth

While looking into our cities to improve crisis management and response, we must also look upward – into space – and harness all the data and information that can help to protect cities and growing urban areas. This session will feature four panellists in a discussion on how evolving technology will help to make urban areas better and safer places for all those who live in them.

15:20 – 15:40

Coffee Break

16:00 – 17:00

Session 3. Cities – the future

Many of the consequences of today’s tipping points will become more acute for the next generation. How do we ensure that they are equipped with the skills, knowledge and education to confront these hazards, and what are their current concerns and areas of research? This session will explore the needs of tomorrow, in the context of today’s lessons identified and lessons learnt.

 

Day Two

People

The aim of this day is to examine how to protect people – whether humanitarian workers in hostile areas, or workers required to travel to ostensibly ‘safer’ areas. How can we prepare them ahead of time and ensure duty of care? What happens if something goes wrong? And how do we look after them afterwards while ensuring reputational damage is kept to a minimum? What communication is required? What type of leadership is needed? This is crisis planning and management at its core.

TimeSession
10:00 – 12:00

Session 1. Protecting our people around the world

Crisis response and duty of care to employees are becoming increasingly vital areas of concern, with many areas of the world – including those previously not considered to be high risk – seeing a greater incidence of events that threaten life safety. This session looks at how individuals, and their employers – whether private sector or humanitarian – can protect themselves before they travel, raise awareness of situational preparedness and provides a case study of protecting workers an extreme hostile environment.

12:00 – 13:30

Lunch and Capability Workshops

13:30 – 15:30

Session 2. Protecting our people, looking inwards

Crisis response when your people are in trouble does not stop once the critical phase ends. This session will present first-hand experience of people who have experienced traumatic and disaster or terrorist related events, and how communication, leadership and continued care are all essential.

15:20 – 15:40

Coffee Break

16:00 – 17:00

Session 3. Looking forwards, the crises of tomorrow

This panel discussion will feature several leading international experts on what is keeping them up at night – including the trends they are seeing – and extrapolating these into possible crisis scenarios of tomorrow. It will cover communication, leadership, geopolitics, fake news and propaganda, reputation management, building trust and the widening pool of stakeholders. It will bring together different stakeholders for their vision of the future, and how we should be planning now to deal with possible consequences and crises arising from today’s emergencies and political landscape.